Local Clinton County, MI Wildlife Control

Types of Clinton County Wildlife Removal Services

animal removal

Clinton County Animal Control Services РBat Removal Solutions 

In Clinton County, MI we provide many animal control and nuisance wildlife services. Our pest control services around Clinton County, MI area are not like that of exterminators. We do not use any types of poisons, fumigations, bait blocks, or any other harmful chemicals whatsoever. Our animal control programs are to simply remove any rodents, birds, and nuisance wild animals and keep them out. Our services include inspection, removal, control, prevention, and clean up. Typical calls that come from the Clinton County, MI Area are because a home owner may here scratching in the attic, bats flying out of the home, raccoons in the fire place, or birds in the vent. Our specialty is bat removal, bat control, and live attic pest exclusions. All of our repairs on the home to keep the wildlife out of the attic are always backed with our five year guarantee. Below are a list of reasons you may call for animal control services in Clinton County, MI.

  • Wildlife Trapping

  • Animal Damage Repairs

  • Preventative Measures

  • Attic Cleanup and Restoration

  • Noises In Walls or Attic

  • Bat and Bird Control

  • Property and Yard Services

  • Emergency Service

  • Clinton County Dead Animal Removal

 

wildlife extermination

Raccoon Feces Clean Up

  • Gray Squirrel Features

  • Choose the Right Skunk Control Method

animal control wildlife

Ever since I started rehabilitating orphaned and injured squirrels many years ago, I would occasionally read a reference to squirrels "purring." Among the numerous squirrels I've raised from infancy or toddler hood, I had never heard a "purr" from any of them. Chirps, barks and squeals, yes, but purrs, no!

I have a handicapped squirrel named Lucky who has been part of our family for almost two years. According to conventional Rehabilitation standards, I'm supposed to euthanize her because; " If you cannot return an animal to the wild, it should be euthanized!" Other so-called "experts" have said; "Squirrels only make good pets for the first six months of their lives, then they become too wild and unpredictable to safely keep as pets." While I agree that a healthy squirrel with no physical handicap should ultimately be allowed to choose to return to the wild, I contend that a squirrel has at least the "potential" to be a good and loving pet! But, I'm a maverick when it comes to agreeing with conventional wisdom!

The purr appears to be a willingness for social interaction. If I walk up to her cage and talk to her and say her name, she eventually will come to the side of the cage and check me out. Since she is a blind squirrel, when she realizes it's me, she starts quietly purring, or as I call it, "oinking," indicating that she knows who I am and she's willing to come out as soon as I open the cage. The conclusion I draw from this is that squirrels purr when they feel safe, contented and willing to interact with others! It makes me feel really good to think that our Lucky girl feels safe and contented and that she is able to verbalize that to us!

Beaver Trapping - Part 1

  • Rabies Infection Risks

  • What is a Skunk's Mating Habits?

wildlife removal com

Ever since I started rehabilitating orphaned and injured squirrels many years ago, I would occasionally read a reference to squirrels "purring." Among the numerous squirrels I've raised from infancy or toddler hood, I had never heard a "purr" from any of them. Chirps, barks and squeals, yes, but purrs, no!

I have a handicapped squirrel named Lucky who has been part of our family for almost two years. According to conventional Rehabilitation standards, I'm supposed to euthanize her because; " If you cannot return an animal to the wild, it should be euthanized!" Other so-called "experts" have said; "Squirrels only make good pets for the first six months of their lives, then they become too wild and unpredictable to safely keep as pets." While I agree that a healthy squirrel with no physical handicap should ultimately be allowed to choose to return to the wild, I contend that a squirrel has at least the "potential" to be a good and loving pet! But, I'm a maverick when it comes to agreeing with conventional wisdom!

The purr appears to be a willingness for social interaction. If I walk up to her cage and talk to her and say her name, she eventually will come to the side of the cage and check me out. Since she is a blind squirrel, when she realizes it's me, she starts quietly purring, or as I call it, "oinking," indicating that she knows who I am and she's willing to come out as soon as I open the cage. The conclusion I draw from this is that squirrels purr when they feel safe, contented and willing to interact with others! It makes me feel really good to think that our Lucky girl feels safe and contented and that she is able to verbalize that to us!

  • Bat Control - Keeping Your Home Bat-Free
  • Skunk Trapping & Control
  • Lyssaviruses, a Virus Which Later Causes Rabies
  • What Do Raccoons Eat?