Local Monroe County, MI Animal Removal

Types of Monroe County Wildlife Removal Services

humane wildlife services

Monroe County Animal Control Services РBat Removal Solutions 

In Monroe County, MI we provide many animal control and nuisance wildlife services. Our pest control services around Monroe County, MI area are not like that of exterminators. We do not use any types of poisons, fumigations, bait blocks, or any other harmful chemicals whatsoever. Our animal control programs are to simply remove any rodents, birds, and nuisance wild animals and keep them out. Our services include inspection, removal, control, prevention, and clean up. Typical calls that come from the Monroe County, MI Area are because a home owner may here scratching in the attic, bats flying out of the home, raccoons in the fire place, or birds in the vent. Our specialty is bat removal, bat control, and live attic pest exclusions. All of our repairs on the home to keep the wildlife out of the attic are always backed with our five year guarantee. Below are a list of reasons you may call for animal control services in Monroe County, MI.

  • Wildlife Trapping

  • Animal Damage Repairs

  • Preventative Measures

  • Attic Cleanup and Restoration

  • Noises In Walls or Attic

  • Bat and Bird Control

  • Property and Yard Services

  • Emergency Service

  • Monroe County Dead Animal Removal

 

humane pest removal

Bat Trapping Services

  • Does Playing a Radio, Using Mothballs, Soaking Rags in Ammonia, or Using Other Folk Remedies Effectively Remove Raccoons from an Attic?

  • Prevention Tips Homeowners Can Follow to Prevent a Raccoon Infestation?

animal trapping company

Raccoons have no manners! They're slobs and the one staring at me didn't seem to really care about the niceties of eating. Bits of dry cat food were soaking up water from where it had been sloshed out of the water bowl. The bag of food I'd laid on a table was now torn open and about 10 pounds of cat chow was strewn across the floor.

This particular raccoon had come in through the pet door into the garage and was happily eating leftovers from my cat Spike's dinner bowl. He obviously had no fear of me, because he kept eating as I walked over to the work bench. Even though he appeared to half tamed, I was trying to keep a little distance between me and the raccoon.

Spike has a bed in the garage, in the house and on the deck. Whenever and wherever the mood strikes him to take a nap, he's not very far from a comfortable pillow. He has become adjusted to seeing raccoons and possums enter his garage at all hours of the night. Tonight he was sleeping on the bed that used to be my work bench before he took it over. He was now peering over the side of the cardboard box that was his bed, at the raccoon that was making a mess of his eating area.

I may have to try trapping the animal, but that didn't work out very well last year. I used a gage-like trap that is supposed to close the entry way into the cage when the animal tries to eat the canned cat food in the back of the cage. It's very humane. Of the five raccoons we had last year, none were caught. I did catch Spike...twice. I've never accused him of being smart!

If you have a 'possum get into your house, the best thing to do is to put a can of cat food just outside the door and let the animal go to the food. Then slam the door shut! They may scare you by hissing and snarling, but that's just their defensive mechanism. It's sort of scary when they bare their fifty teeth, but more than likely if you back away, they'll never hurt you. One good thing about confrontations with a 'possum is that they hardly ever get rabies.

I really hope they'll leave soon. Spike and I would like to get our garage back.

Baby Skunks

  • Squirrel Diseases

  • Identify Areas of Skunk Damage

wildlife control services

You found a baby squirrel, and now need information on how to care for it. You're about to experience one of the most rewarding activities on earth!

The ideal situation would be to return the baby to it's mother. If you place it in a small box with a warm rice bag, and tack it to the tree where you found it, it's possible that mom will come and take it back to an alternate nest. If the mother doesn't come within an hour, the baby becomes your charge.

Relax, caring for baby squirrels is easy! If you don't have the time or will to do it, every State has licensed wild animal rehabilitators who can do the job. If you do have the time and can remember the acronym, "WHAM," you can easily and confidently care for a baby squirrel!

The letter W, stands for warm. Baby squirrels need to be kept warm. You never should attempt to feed a baby until it is completely warmed. A baby squirrel should always feel warm the the touch when you pick it up. When the baby is less than 5 weeks old, (before it's eyes open,) it can easily be kept in a cardboard box. I like to use rice bags to keep my baby squirrels warm. I heat the bag in the microwave until it is warm to the touch, place it in the box, punch it down in the center to make a nest, place pieces of blanket or fleece material over the bag, put the baby squirrel in and cover it with more soft cloth. This method keeps the baby warm between feedings.

Some people like to use a heating pad on the low setting under the box. If it's placed under half of the box, the baby squirrel will climb on and off the heated side until it finds a comfortable sleeping temperature. Either way, this accomplishes the task of keeping the baby squirrel warm.

The need for calcium, especially in captivity, is one of the most critical aspects of raising a squirrel. In fact, it is the most important factor in success or failure when it comes to raising a baby squirrel! If a baby squirrel does not have an adequate source of calcium after it stops nursing, it will develop a condition called Metabolic Bone Disease, or Rickets. I don't know how many times I've gotten e-mails from panicked people telling me their 5 or 6 month old squirrel was fine one day and the next day lost the use of it's rear legs. It happens that fast, and is completely preventable!

There are many more details about how to take care of a baby squirrel, that are beyond the scope of this article. My desire is to help you take the right first steps in this rewarding endeavor, and to let you know that I am always available to help and answer any and all questions about the care of a baby squirrel! On my website I offer free recipes, advice and e-books at no charge to help you successfully raise a healthy and happy squirrel!

  • Signs of a Squirrel Infestation
  • Beaver Trapping - Part 1
  • Squirrels Stealing Bird Seed
  • Get Rid of Skunks Under Homes