Franklin, MI Wildlife Control

Best Franklin MI Wildlife Removal Company

wildlife trapping services

Are you frustrated by wildlife damaging your backyard in Franklin, MI? Have squirrel and raccoons and mice taken over your home? Do you have a skunk problem? Don’t despair! There is one company to call for humane resolutions to all of your animal-control dilemmas: We are the best in Franklin Animal Control.

As an owner-operated company, our company proudly delivers prompt and professional Franklin Michigan service. We are certified by the Michigan and National Animal Damage Control Associations, and all of our technicians are state-certified. You can count on us for expert removal and handling of annoying animals. In addition, we are bonded and fully insured for your protection. Call us and learn more!

wildlife control specialists

We can help you with all types of animal and wildlife removal, including:

  • Attic & wall noise from wild animals
  • Mouse control in attic & walls
  • Exterior mouse and mole removal and control
  • Winter damage shrubbery control from wild animals
  • Night time attic noises and night time wall noises from rodents and other animals
pest removal service

Types of Animals and Pests We Control

These critters can get cause harm, including Raccoon, Skunk, Squirrel, Mice, Moles, Woodchucks, Groundhogs, Bats, Chipmunks, and Opossums.

  • How to get squirrels out of the attic

  • How to get raccoons out of the attic

  • How to get rid of raccoons in the attic

  • How to remove bats in the attic

  • How to remove opossums in the attic

  • Dead Animal Removal Services

humane wildlife control

Franklin Pest Control Service And Critter Removal

 

animal removal

How to Control Squirrels?

  • Squirrels in Walls

  • What is a Skunk's Natural Diet?

wild animal removal

The Beaver of North America has a world-wide reputation for its wonderful instinct and shrewdness. The general appearance of this animal is that of a very large muskrat with a broad flattened tail, and the habits of both these animals are in many respects alike. The beaver is an amphibious creature and social in its habits of living, large numbers congregating together and forming little villages. The muskrat has this same propensity, but the habitation of the beaver is on a much more extensive scale. These huts or "Beaver lodges," are generally made in rivers and brooks; although sometimes in lakes or large ponds. They are chiefly composed of branches, moss, grass and mud, and are large enough to accommodate a family of five or six.

The form of the "lodges" is dome-like, and it varies considerably in size. The foundation is made on the bottom of the river, and the hut is built up like a mound, often twenty feet in diameter and projecting several feet above the surface of the water. The walls of this structure are often five or six feet thick, and the roofs are all finished off with a thick layer of mud laid on with amazing smoothness. These huts form the winter habitations of the beavers, and as this compost of mud, grass and branches becomes congealed into a solid mass by the severe frosts of winter, it can easily be seen that they afford a safe shelter against any intruder and particularly the wolverine, which is a most deadly enemy to the beaver. So hard does this frozen mass become as to defy even the edges of iron tools, and the breaking open of the "Beaver houses" is at no time an easy task. Causing many duck hunters to employ the use of dynamite! Beavers work almost entirely in the dark; and a pond which is calm and placid in the day time will be found in the night to be full of life and motion, and the squealing and splashing in the water will bear evidence of their industry. Lest the beavers should not have a sufficient depth of water at all seasons, they are in the habit of constructing veritable dams to ensure that result.

The beavers, alarmed at the invasion of their sanctums, make for the banks, and the ready huntsmen stationed at the various holes, watch for their victims beneath the openings, until a violent motion or discoloration of the water betrays their passage beneath. The entrance to the holes in the bank is then instantly closed with stakes and the beaver is made prisoner in his burrow. When the depth of the burrow will admit, the arm of the hunter is introduced, and the animal pulled out, but otherwise a long hook lashed to a pole is employed for this purpose. Scores of beavers are sometimes taken in this way in a few hours. Spearing is also often successfully resorted to, and when the ice is thin and transparent the beavers may be clearly observed as they come to the surface, beneath the ice, for air.

How To Take Care of a Baby Squirrel

  • Squirrels Stealing Bird Seed

  • Raccoons: Habits of Your Everyday Raccoon

free wildlife removal services

Raccoons have no manners! They're slobs and the one staring at me didn't seem to really care about the niceties of eating. Bits of dry cat food were soaking up water from where it had been sloshed out of the water bowl. The bag of food I'd laid on a table was now torn open and about 10 pounds of cat chow was strewn across the floor.

This particular raccoon had come in through the pet door into the garage and was happily eating leftovers from my cat Spike's dinner bowl. He obviously had no fear of me, because he kept eating as I walked over to the work bench. Even though he appeared to half tamed, I was trying to keep a little distance between me and the raccoon.

Spike has a bed in the garage, in the house and on the deck. Whenever and wherever the mood strikes him to take a nap, he's not very far from a comfortable pillow. He has become adjusted to seeing raccoons and possums enter his garage at all hours of the night. Tonight he was sleeping on the bed that used to be my work bench before he took it over. He was now peering over the side of the cardboard box that was his bed, at the raccoon that was making a mess of his eating area.

I may have to try trapping the animal, but that didn't work out very well last year. I used a gage-like trap that is supposed to close the entry way into the cage when the animal tries to eat the canned cat food in the back of the cage. It's very humane. Of the five raccoons we had last year, none were caught. I did catch Spike...twice. I've never accused him of being smart!

If you have a 'possum get into your house, the best thing to do is to put a can of cat food just outside the door and let the animal go to the food. Then slam the door shut! They may scare you by hissing and snarling, but that's just their defensive mechanism. It's sort of scary when they bare their fifty teeth, but more than likely if you back away, they'll never hurt you. One good thing about confrontations with a 'possum is that they hardly ever get rabies.

I really hope they'll leave soon. Spike and I would like to get our garage back.

Squirrels - The Plague of Southern Ohio in the Early 1800s

  • Raccoon Extermination Services

  • Raccoon Feces Clean Up

nuisance wildlife removal

Raccoons have no manners! They're slobs and the one staring at me didn't seem to really care about the niceties of eating. Bits of dry cat food were soaking up water from where it had been sloshed out of the water bowl. The bag of food I'd laid on a table was now torn open and about 10 pounds of cat chow was strewn across the floor.

This particular raccoon had come in through the pet door into the garage and was happily eating leftovers from my cat Spike's dinner bowl. He obviously had no fear of me, because he kept eating as I walked over to the work bench. Even though he appeared to half tamed, I was trying to keep a little distance between me and the raccoon.

Spike has a bed in the garage, in the house and on the deck. Whenever and wherever the mood strikes him to take a nap, he's not very far from a comfortable pillow. He has become adjusted to seeing raccoons and possums enter his garage at all hours of the night. Tonight he was sleeping on the bed that used to be my work bench before he took it over. He was now peering over the side of the cardboard box that was his bed, at the raccoon that was making a mess of his eating area.

I may have to try trapping the animal, but that didn't work out very well last year. I used a gage-like trap that is supposed to close the entry way into the cage when the animal tries to eat the canned cat food in the back of the cage. It's very humane. Of the five raccoons we had last year, none were caught. I did catch Spike...twice. I've never accused him of being smart!

If you have a 'possum get into your house, the best thing to do is to put a can of cat food just outside the door and let the animal go to the food. Then slam the door shut! They may scare you by hissing and snarling, but that's just their defensive mechanism. It's sort of scary when they bare their fifty teeth, but more than likely if you back away, they'll never hurt you. One good thing about confrontations with a 'possum is that they hardly ever get rabies.

I really hope they'll leave soon. Spike and I would like to get our garage back.

  • Histoplasmosis, a Disease Affecting the Lungs and Other Organs From Bat Guano
  • Skunk Reproduction
  • Raccoon Bait - Advice on What Bait to Use to Catch a Raccoon
  • Raccoon Repellents

Local Oakland County, MI Wildlife Removal