Tyrone Twp, MI Wildlife Control

Best Tyrone Twp MI Animal Removal Company

animal control wildlife

Are you frustrated by wildlife damaging your backyard in Tyrone Twp, MI? Have squirrel and raccoons and mice taken over your home? Do you have a skunk problem? Don’t despair! There is one company to call for humane resolutions to all of your animal-control dilemmas: We are the best in Tyrone Twp Animal Control.

As an owner-operated company, our company proudly delivers prompt and professional Tyrone Twp Michigan service. We are certified by the Michigan and National Animal Damage Control Associations, and all of our technicians are state-certified. You can count on us for expert removal and handling of annoying animals. In addition, we are bonded and fully insured for your protection. Call us and learn more!

raccoon removal

We can help you with all types of animal and wildlife removal, including:

  • Attic & wall noise from wild animals
  • Mouse control in attic & walls
  • Exterior mouse and mole removal and control
  • Winter damage shrubbery control from wild animals
  • Night time attic noises and night time wall noises from rodents and other animals
humane animal removal

Types of Animals and Pests We Control

These critters can get cause harm, including Raccoon, Skunk, Squirrel, Mice, Moles, Woodchucks, Groundhogs, Bats, Chipmunks, and Opossums.

  • How to get squirrels out of the attic

  • How to get raccoons out of the attic

  • How to get rid of raccoons in the attic

  • How to remove bats in the attic

  • How to remove opossums in the attic

  • Dead Animal Removal Services

wildlife removal service

Tyrone Twp Pest Control Service And Critter Removal

 

wildlife control company

Dead Skunk Removal

  • What Does Raccoon Feces Look Like?

  • Bat Control, Removal & Exclusion

wildlife relocation service

While some of us may think raccoons are cute, many who suffer nightly trash raids from these little "masked bandits" really do not find them to be so adorable, in particular when they scatter the trash all over our yards. If you're an example of these unfortunate souls who might be suffering from raccoons in your trash, attic, or yard, you are probably searching for a type of raccoon deterrent to keep these critters at bay. There are various options available, however if you are looking for an affordable and easy way, why don't you consider creating your own homemade raccoon repellent?

There are numerous simple and proven ways for you create repellents with the use of some quite common food ingredients and household items. Raccoons possess a strong sense of smell, so the idea is to try to use items that contain strong or sharp odors which will deter them from coming near the trash. Below are some of the most common ones that could be made easily and speedily.

Vinegar

This deterrent is more effective for taste than it is for smell. Raccoons are turned off from the taste of vinegar, so simply immerse discarded foodstuffs such as corn cobs in vinegar for a couple of hours and set the items close to the trash. Also, spray the garbage can with vinegar so the raccoon associates that bad taste with the trash as a whole.

These are just a couple of the easy ways to construct homemade raccoon repellents, but you can always experiment with what can work in your case. Keep under consideration that it is advisable to use items that possess a really strong or sharp stench and also remember to be vigilant about applying it frequently. With time you should discover the raccoons will eventually have to agree with you that yes, your trash is just plain stinky.

Why Is There a Dead Raccoon in My Yard?

  • Raccoon Repellents

  • Squirrels Chewing on Woodwork

animal & wildlife control

Raccoons have no manners! They're slobs and the one staring at me didn't seem to really care about the niceties of eating. Bits of dry cat food were soaking up water from where it had been sloshed out of the water bowl. The bag of food I'd laid on a table was now torn open and about 10 pounds of cat chow was strewn across the floor.

This particular raccoon had come in through the pet door into the garage and was happily eating leftovers from my cat Spike's dinner bowl. He obviously had no fear of me, because he kept eating as I walked over to the work bench. Even though he appeared to half tamed, I was trying to keep a little distance between me and the raccoon.

Spike has a bed in the garage, in the house and on the deck. Whenever and wherever the mood strikes him to take a nap, he's not very far from a comfortable pillow. He has become adjusted to seeing raccoons and possums enter his garage at all hours of the night. Tonight he was sleeping on the bed that used to be my work bench before he took it over. He was now peering over the side of the cardboard box that was his bed, at the raccoon that was making a mess of his eating area.

I may have to try trapping the animal, but that didn't work out very well last year. I used a gage-like trap that is supposed to close the entry way into the cage when the animal tries to eat the canned cat food in the back of the cage. It's very humane. Of the five raccoons we had last year, none were caught. I did catch Spike...twice. I've never accused him of being smart!

If you have a 'possum get into your house, the best thing to do is to put a can of cat food just outside the door and let the animal go to the food. Then slam the door shut! They may scare you by hissing and snarling, but that's just their defensive mechanism. It's sort of scary when they bare their fifty teeth, but more than likely if you back away, they'll never hurt you. One good thing about confrontations with a 'possum is that they hardly ever get rabies.

I really hope they'll leave soon. Spike and I would like to get our garage back.

Raccoon Control Services

  • Bat Pest Control - Not Your Typical Extermination

  • Raccoon Removal & Control

wildlife exterminator

You found a baby squirrel, and now need information on how to care for it. You're about to experience one of the most rewarding activities on earth!

The ideal situation would be to return the baby to it's mother. If you place it in a small box with a warm rice bag, and tack it to the tree where you found it, it's possible that mom will come and take it back to an alternate nest. If the mother doesn't come within an hour, the baby becomes your charge.

Relax, caring for baby squirrels is easy! If you don't have the time or will to do it, every State has licensed wild animal rehabilitators who can do the job. If you do have the time and can remember the acronym, "WHAM," you can easily and confidently care for a baby squirrel!

The letter W, stands for warm. Baby squirrels need to be kept warm. You never should attempt to feed a baby until it is completely warmed. A baby squirrel should always feel warm the the touch when you pick it up. When the baby is less than 5 weeks old, (before it's eyes open,) it can easily be kept in a cardboard box. I like to use rice bags to keep my baby squirrels warm. I heat the bag in the microwave until it is warm to the touch, place it in the box, punch it down in the center to make a nest, place pieces of blanket or fleece material over the bag, put the baby squirrel in and cover it with more soft cloth. This method keeps the baby warm between feedings.

Some people like to use a heating pad on the low setting under the box. If it's placed under half of the box, the baby squirrel will climb on and off the heated side until it finds a comfortable sleeping temperature. Either way, this accomplishes the task of keeping the baby squirrel warm.

The need for calcium, especially in captivity, is one of the most critical aspects of raising a squirrel. In fact, it is the most important factor in success or failure when it comes to raising a baby squirrel! If a baby squirrel does not have an adequate source of calcium after it stops nursing, it will develop a condition called Metabolic Bone Disease, or Rickets. I don't know how many times I've gotten e-mails from panicked people telling me their 5 or 6 month old squirrel was fine one day and the next day lost the use of it's rear legs. It happens that fast, and is completely preventable!

There are many more details about how to take care of a baby squirrel, that are beyond the scope of this article. My desire is to help you take the right first steps in this rewarding endeavor, and to let you know that I am always available to help and answer any and all questions about the care of a baby squirrel! On my website I offer free recipes, advice and e-books at no charge to help you successfully raise a healthy and happy squirrel!

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Local Livingston County, MI Wildlife Control