Woodstock Twp, MI Wildlife Removal

Best Woodstock Twp MI Wildlife Control Company

wildlife relocation service

Are you frustrated by wildlife damaging your backyard in Woodstock Twp, MI? Have squirrel and raccoons and mice taken over your home? Do you have a skunk problem? Don’t despair! There is one company to call for humane resolutions to all of your animal-control dilemmas: We are the best in Woodstock Twp Animal Control.

As an owner-operated company, our company proudly delivers prompt and professional Woodstock Twp Michigan service. We are certified by the Michigan and National Animal Damage Control Associations, and all of our technicians are state-certified. You can count on us for expert removal and handling of annoying animals. In addition, we are bonded and fully insured for your protection. Call us and learn more!

varmint removal

We can help you with all types of animal and wildlife removal, including:

  • Attic & wall noise from wild animals
  • Mouse control in attic & walls
  • Exterior mouse and mole removal and control
  • Winter damage shrubbery control from wild animals
  • Night time attic noises and night time wall noises from rodents and other animals
varmint removal

Types of Animals and Pests We Control

These critters can get cause harm, including Raccoon, Skunk, Squirrel, Mice, Moles, Woodchucks, Groundhogs, Bats, Chipmunks, and Opossums.

  • How to get squirrels out of the attic

  • How to get raccoons out of the attic

  • How to get rid of raccoons in the attic

  • How to remove bats in the attic

  • How to remove opossums in the attic

  • Dead Animal Removal Services

wildlife exterminator

Woodstock Twp Pest Control Service And Critter Removal

 

pest removal service

Skunk Burrows

  • Raccoon Feces & Urine – Do They Cause Disease?

  • Is a Skunk That is Active During the Day Time Rabid?

nuisance wildlife removal

The Beaver of North America has a world-wide reputation for its wonderful instinct and shrewdness. The general appearance of this animal is that of a very large muskrat with a broad flattened tail, and the habits of both these animals are in many respects alike. The beaver is an amphibious creature and social in its habits of living, large numbers congregating together and forming little villages. The muskrat has this same propensity, but the habitation of the beaver is on a much more extensive scale. These huts or "Beaver lodges," are generally made in rivers and brooks; although sometimes in lakes or large ponds. They are chiefly composed of branches, moss, grass and mud, and are large enough to accommodate a family of five or six.

The form of the "lodges" is dome-like, and it varies considerably in size. The foundation is made on the bottom of the river, and the hut is built up like a mound, often twenty feet in diameter and projecting several feet above the surface of the water. The walls of this structure are often five or six feet thick, and the roofs are all finished off with a thick layer of mud laid on with amazing smoothness. These huts form the winter habitations of the beavers, and as this compost of mud, grass and branches becomes congealed into a solid mass by the severe frosts of winter, it can easily be seen that they afford a safe shelter against any intruder and particularly the wolverine, which is a most deadly enemy to the beaver. So hard does this frozen mass become as to defy even the edges of iron tools, and the breaking open of the "Beaver houses" is at no time an easy task. Causing many duck hunters to employ the use of dynamite! Beavers work almost entirely in the dark; and a pond which is calm and placid in the day time will be found in the night to be full of life and motion, and the squealing and splashing in the water will bear evidence of their industry. Lest the beavers should not have a sufficient depth of water at all seasons, they are in the habit of constructing veritable dams to ensure that result.

The beavers, alarmed at the invasion of their sanctums, make for the banks, and the ready huntsmen stationed at the various holes, watch for their victims beneath the openings, until a violent motion or discoloration of the water betrays their passage beneath. The entrance to the holes in the bank is then instantly closed with stakes and the beaver is made prisoner in his burrow. When the depth of the burrow will admit, the arm of the hunter is introduced, and the animal pulled out, but otherwise a long hook lashed to a pole is employed for this purpose. Scores of beavers are sometimes taken in this way in a few hours. Spearing is also often successfully resorted to, and when the ice is thin and transparent the beavers may be clearly observed as they come to the surface, beneath the ice, for air.

Can I Use Poison to Kill Bats?

  • Dead Animal Removal Company

  • Stains and Odors from Bat Urine

wildlife control services

Raccoons are not particular on their diet. Raccoons eat a numerous variety of foods. Raccoons are considered Omnivores, (ones that eat plants and meat.) Raccoons eat and scavenge for food all night, and it depends a lot on where they live.

For example: If a Raccoon lives in a heavily populated area like a city, they tend to eat out of dumpsters, trashcans, will eat pet food, can eat fish out of a backyard pond, and also have been known to eat road kill. A Raccoons diet in this particular location is not healthy, and Raccoons can get sick and be very unhealthy. On the other hand, if a Raccoon lives in Rural areas (country) they tend to have a healthier diet and will eat berries, crawfish, insects, small rodents, fruits, poultry, eggs, small snakes, frogs, and fish. Raccoons have an amazing survival instinct, which means they will rarely starve to death. (Which is not surprising with the amount of junk and waste there is)

Raccoons eat and scavenge mainly at night because they are nocturnal, which means they sleep during the day and are awake at night. Raccoons have much determination when it comes to food and will do anything to get it. Raccoons usually scavenge and feed alone, but occasionally have friends join every now and then. They are notorious for making messes and destroying most anything to get what they want. If you have ever seen a Raccoon eat, you will notice how they use their hands. They are very touchy/feely with most everything. If Raccoons have a source of water nearby they have a habit of washing their food. It's almost as if they are playing with it in the water.

How to Get Rid of Squirrels

  • Nipah and Hendra Viruses

  • Skunk Smell

wildlife removal company

When we think about the dangerous animals faced by our pioneer ancestors, what comes to mind? Probably we would imagine wolves, bears, panthers, and poisonous reptiles. Few would consider the lowly squirrel! But for the early Ohio settlers, the squirrel was the cause of famine and suffering.

As pioneers moved into the Valley of the Paint in southern Ohio in the early 1800s, they immediately began to radically change the area's landscape. Cabins had to be built, fireplaces stoked, and fields cleared for planting. As a result, the great oak, beech, chestnut, and black walnut trees were cut down far and wide. Trees not needed for building were rolled to the vast fires and destroyed.

These trees, especially the nut-bearing ones, were the habitat and food source for the hundreds, perhaps thousands, of squirrels in the area. In short order, the squirrels were desperate for food. They turned to the easiest and most abundant food source-the pioneers' crops.

The harsh winter of 1807-08 nearly eliminated squirrels as a species in the Valley, and the levy was allowed to expire. The pioneers continued to subdue the wilderness and open the land to agriculture. The days of the great forests blanketing Appalachian Ohio were coming to an end. In their place now stood row upon row of tall corn plants and waving wheat. Civilization was on the march.

Although most people would name wolves or rattlesnakes as the worst danger to early Ohio pioneers, it was the squirrel that caused the most suffering. Man's effect on the rodents' food source led to crop loss and famine. The county act that required the killing of the squirrels, along with the settlers' sharing with their neighbors in need, helped the new community make it through the long, cold winter to come.

  • Eliminate Skunk Food and Shelter
  • Bat Extermination Services
  • Spotted Skunk
  • Bat Removal & Control, Bat in Attic

Local Lenawee County, MI Wildlife Control