Wales Twp, MI Wildlife Removal

Best Wales Twp MI Animal Removal Company

pest removal service

Are you frustrated by wildlife damaging your backyard in Wales Twp, MI? Have squirrel and raccoons and mice taken over your home? Do you have a skunk problem? Don’t despair! There is one company to call for humane resolutions to all of your animal-control dilemmas: We are the best in Wales Twp Animal Control.

As an owner-operated company, our company proudly delivers prompt and professional Wales Twp Michigan service. We are certified by the Michigan and National Animal Damage Control Associations, and all of our technicians are state-certified. You can count on us for expert removal and handling of annoying animals. In addition, we are bonded and fully insured for your protection. Call us and learn more!

humane wildlife control

We can help you with all types of animal and wildlife removal, including:

  • Attic & wall noise from wild animals
  • Mouse control in attic & walls
  • Exterior mouse and mole removal and control
  • Winter damage shrubbery control from wild animals
  • Night time attic noises and night time wall noises from rodents and other animals
wild animal control

Types of Animals and Pests We Control

These critters can get cause harm, including Raccoon, Skunk, Squirrel, Mice, Moles, Woodchucks, Groundhogs, Bats, Chipmunks, and Opossums.

  • How to get squirrels out of the attic

  • How to get raccoons out of the attic

  • How to get rid of raccoons in the attic

  • How to remove bats in the attic

  • How to remove opossums in the attic

  • Dead Animal Removal Services

pest and wildlife control

Wales Twp Pest Control Service And Critter Removal

 

wildlife removal com

Identify Skunk Damage

  • Hair Loss in Squirrels

  • Skunk is Living Under Deck or Porch

animal removal

Bats conservationist are magnanimous in saying that bats are not creepy worthless creatures. They make up to a nearly 1000 species which make up of one fourth of earth mammal's populace.

New research have shown that they're better friends to humans in the control of agricultural pests than anyone can imagine. A group of 150 big brown bats can easily consume 600,000 cucumber beetles, if which if allowed to lay eggs, could produce 33 million root worms, a serious agricultural pests to overcome by farmers.

A Texas based Bat Conservation International (BCI) has sponsored a cultural study where they identify some 300 plant species worldwide that need bats for propagation. From these plants, roughly 450 commercial products are made at annual value of hundreds million of dollars.

In Asian countries, people have traditionally viewed bats as harbingers of good, this belief could have arisen when farmers thousands of years ago saw bats eating insects that prey on plants. There are also some species of some bats that prey on mosquitoes, there are the cave nectar bats that assist in pollination that feed on mangrove, jack fruit, mango, banana and other tropical fruits.

Bat manure known as guano are good source of organic fertilizer.

Raccoon Removal & Control

  • Squirrels on the Roof

  • Coronaviruses, a Condition Resulting in Mild Respiratory Illnesses

nuisance wildlife removal

When we think about the dangerous animals faced by our pioneer ancestors, what comes to mind? Probably we would imagine wolves, bears, panthers, and poisonous reptiles. Few would consider the lowly squirrel! But for the early Ohio settlers, the squirrel was the cause of famine and suffering.

As pioneers moved into the Valley of the Paint in southern Ohio in the early 1800s, they immediately began to radically change the area's landscape. Cabins had to be built, fireplaces stoked, and fields cleared for planting. As a result, the great oak, beech, chestnut, and black walnut trees were cut down far and wide. Trees not needed for building were rolled to the vast fires and destroyed.

These trees, especially the nut-bearing ones, were the habitat and food source for the hundreds, perhaps thousands, of squirrels in the area. In short order, the squirrels were desperate for food. They turned to the easiest and most abundant food source-the pioneers' crops.

The harsh winter of 1807-08 nearly eliminated squirrels as a species in the Valley, and the levy was allowed to expire. The pioneers continued to subdue the wilderness and open the land to agriculture. The days of the great forests blanketing Appalachian Ohio were coming to an end. In their place now stood row upon row of tall corn plants and waving wheat. Civilization was on the march.

Although most people would name wolves or rattlesnakes as the worst danger to early Ohio pioneers, it was the squirrel that caused the most suffering. Man's effect on the rodents' food source led to crop loss and famine. The county act that required the killing of the squirrels, along with the settlers' sharing with their neighbors in need, helped the new community make it through the long, cold winter to come.

Squirrels in Attics

  • Spotted Skunk

  • 13 Home Remedies For Keeping Squirrels Away

wildlife removal services

Ever since I started rehabilitating orphaned and injured squirrels many years ago, I would occasionally read a reference to squirrels "purring." Among the numerous squirrels I've raised from infancy or toddler hood, I had never heard a "purr" from any of them. Chirps, barks and squeals, yes, but purrs, no!

I have a handicapped squirrel named Lucky who has been part of our family for almost two years. According to conventional Rehabilitation standards, I'm supposed to euthanize her because; " If you cannot return an animal to the wild, it should be euthanized!" Other so-called "experts" have said; "Squirrels only make good pets for the first six months of their lives, then they become too wild and unpredictable to safely keep as pets." While I agree that a healthy squirrel with no physical handicap should ultimately be allowed to choose to return to the wild, I contend that a squirrel has at least the "potential" to be a good and loving pet! But, I'm a maverick when it comes to agreeing with conventional wisdom!

The purr appears to be a willingness for social interaction. If I walk up to her cage and talk to her and say her name, she eventually will come to the side of the cage and check me out. Since she is a blind squirrel, when she realizes it's me, she starts quietly purring, or as I call it, "oinking," indicating that she knows who I am and she's willing to come out as soon as I open the cage. The conclusion I draw from this is that squirrels purr when they feel safe, contented and willing to interact with others! It makes me feel really good to think that our Lucky girl feels safe and contented and that she is able to verbalize that to us!

  • Should I Feed a Baby Skunk I Found?
  • Gray Squirrel Features
  • Have a Bat in Your Home?
  • How to Use One-way Exclusion Funnels to Remove Skunks

Local Saint Clair County, MI Wildlife Removal